About Us

The K12 Youth Code international league is designed to encourage technology and STEM interest among students in 3rd through 8th Grade. Our system is a fully automated for managing a national MIT Scratch programming coding tournament targeted to middle and elementary school students. Each competition will run for ten week intervals and will incorporate interdisciplinary challenges based on Common Core material students learn in class.

The league today has the capacity to accommodate more than one million student coders with minimal dependence on human resources. While MIT's Scratch Programming will be used in our Spring 2019 competition, we have plans to incorporate competitions that focus on robotics and drone use in our later competitions.

“Scratch is a media-rich programming environment” recently developed by MIT’s Media Lab. The Scratch language and the development environment are designed to be intuitive and easily learned by children without previous programming experience.
The main arguments behind the push for students to learn to code and specifically girls and students of color, usually center around preparing students for future jobs. There is a skill shortage in the Computer Science industry which expects a shortfall of more than one million jobs within the next 10 years.

Even students who do not work in the technology industry will also benefit throughout their life and careers by learning computer science, as all industries now involve some component of programming. Kids are growing up in a very different world than that of their parents. Many devices and services including Youtube, Netflix, Instagram, Snapchat, and Facebook are embedded in their daily lives. Even many 21st century toys are digital and programmable.

Outside of this, there is a skill shortage in the Computer Science industry which expects a shortfall of more than one million jobs within the next 10 years. Your children should be educated and prepared for the future and K12 Youth Code is here to help.

"We find that, not only did Scratch excite students at a critical time (i.e., their first foray into computer science), it also familiarized the inexperienced among them with fundamentals of programming without the distraction of syntax. Moreover, when asked via surveys at term’s end to reflect on how their initial experience with Scratch affected their subsequent experience with Java, most students (76%) felt that Scratch was a positive influence, particularly those without prior background."

- David J. Malan, Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences Harvard University